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Trend Alert: Clear Tote Bags

Clear tote bags are the rage of the runways – which means the trend could soon be sweeping the promotional products industry too.

While the roots of clear tote bags might be utilitarian, some high fashion labels have suddenly fell in love with them, creating astoundingly expensive offerings in the category. The Prada tote below is a great example of the trend. It was retailing online at Nordstrom recently for $1,040 before selling out.

Made in Italy from PVC, the transparent tote features Prada's black logo print across the front and a white canvas trim. In a little nod to privacy, the push-stud top closure reveals a detachable zip-fastening pouch for storing essentials out of sight.

Meanwhile, this transparent Kara PVC Pinch Tote is another example of transparency couture. It retails for $325 at ssense.com – hardly even the cost of a lunchtime appetizer for your average Manhattan billionaire.

For those of us sitting in the proletarian seats, though, there's good news. You can still get in on the namebrand clear tote trend for a relatively reasonable price. Urban Outfitters offers this tote for $25.

Interestingly, the high-fashion transparent trend extends beyond totes into other bag categories, including reusable shopping bags. The bag below is an exclusive collaboration between Voo Store and Belgian fashion designer Raf Simons. Available for about $180, the bag includes a dustbag that can also be used as an inner compartment.

Given the popularity of clear bags in fashion circles, promotional product distributors should anticipate that demand from clients in the promo space will increase, too. And who knows – the trend could proliferate well beyond bags altogether, if this tweet from Prada is a clue.

Lego Lovers Crowded Expo Center for Merch, Memories

Lego enthusiasts of all ages crowded into the Greater Philadelphia Expo Center in Oaks, PA, on April 21 and 22 to enjoy Brick Fest Live!, which bills itself as the #1 Lego event in the U.S. The show featured feats of artistry and engineering, including detailed cityscapes, working miniature rollercoasters, a life-size statue of Darth Vader and a lovingly rendered replica of Vincent Van Gogh's "Starry Night" – all crafted from the colorful plastic bricks that have been a toy chest necessity for decades.

The event was also an opportunity for vendors to peddle Lego-themed merch, from vintage building sets to apparel and accessories decorated with actual Legos. At the official Brick Fest Live! Booth, attendees could purchase a $20 #BrickSwag box, which included a T-shirt, flashlight keychain and a mystery minifigure. Other booths were selling caps modified with Lego baseplates, allowing wearers to customize to their heart's content. Several entrepreneurs had crafted hair clips, bracelets, earrings and bow ties out of Legos. There were even brick-shaped pillows and molded chocolate lollipops.

The Pennsylvania Distance Learning Charter School also set up a booth at the expo to share information about its virtual summer camps. To help build goodwill and boost name recognition, the school was giving away a slew of promotional products. Children could spin a wheel, and receive a branded foam stress brick, backpack, temporary tattoo, chip clip or other prize.

Brick Fest Live! heads next to New York City in July, then stops in Pasadena, CA, in August and Houston in October. Check out some of the highlights from the Philadelphia show below.













Hawaii Bans Certain Types of Sunscreens

Hawaii's state legislature has passed a bill that bans sunscreens containing chemicals that can reportedly damage coral reefs – a new regulation that could impact sales of branded sunscreen.

Senate Bill 2571, passed on Tuesday, prevents the sale and distribution of sunscreen that has oxybenzone and octinoxate, unless prescribed by a licensed healthcare provider. If Governor David Ige signs the legislation into law, the prohibition would take effect Jan. 1, 2021.

Should the ban become law, promo distributors and suppliers could no longer provide sunscreen containing the blacklisted chemicals in the Aloha State. What's more, the Hawaiian ban could resonate to the U.S. mainland, possibly influencing some would-be buyers of branded sunscreen to seek natural options that are perceived as better for the environment – or to avoid purchasing sunscreen altogether in fear their brand will be perceived as a polluter.

Found in popular sunscreen brands like Coppertone and Hawaiian Tropic, oxybenzone and octinoxate contribute to coral bleaching, studies show. For example, a recent study from the Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology found that chemicals in sunscreen kill coral and result in DNA damage in larval and adult stage coral. The impact on DNA limits coral's ability to grow and develop healthily. Coral bleaching was reportedly a cause behind widespread destruction of Australia's Great Barrier Reef. According to researchers, about 14,000 tons of sunscreen glop onto coral reefs annually. Sunscreen concentrations were found to be among the highest in the world on the beaches of Hawaii and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Certain environmental organizations praised legislators for passing the bill.

"Hawaii's reefs have been slowly dying over the past 20 years, and that death spiral has been accelerating with the impact of El Niño-induced mass bleaching events and increased local pollution impacts from both tourism and development," Craig Downs, the executive director of the Haereticus Environmental Laboratory, told The New York Times. "Everyone has come together to support this legislation, from local nurses and doctors, to resorts and airlines, as well as the entrepreneurial spirit of new sunscreen companies to supply reef-safer products."

Of course, the ban had opponents, too. Traditional sunscreen manufacturers pointed out that the chemicals are FDA-approved and important ingredients for protecting people from skin cancer. Ban opponents also included the Hawaii Medical Association. The association expressed worry that the prohibition could encourage people to reduce the degree to which they wear sunscreen – a concern given the heightened risk for skin cancer that comes with not using sunscreen.

Forbes reports that mounting public pushback against sunscreens containing oxybenzone and octinoxate has opened the door for a niche market focused on natural sunscreens made in Hawaii. "Tourists and locals on the islands can find Kōkua Sun Care Hawaiian Natural Zinc Sunscreen, Mama Kuleana Reef, and the mainland All Good products," wrote Geologist Trevor Nace for Forbes. Of course, chemicals found in sunscreens are far from the only pollutant causing problems for coral reefs. Ocean warming, agricultural runoff and sewage dumping also are weakening and killing reefs, research shows.

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